German Surface Vessels 2
Navies of the second world war Second Edition
 
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H.T. Lenton
1968
Macdonald & Co /Publischers) Ltd., London
Waterlow & Sons Ldt., London, Dunstable and Hyde
2. Auflage
159
16,5 x 11 x 1,3 cm
205 g
Kartoneinband mit illustrierter Schutzumschlag
,- £
 

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White the first volume of this series was devoted to the regular warships of the German Navy, this second volume lists some of the auxiliary units without which no fleet Gould operate. To have listed them all would have needed considerable space: consequently, only a selection has been male amongst the more interesting conversions, and from Chose naval vessels which were captured by the German Navy and put to use. Although the latter formed a considerable addition to the German fleet, the acquisition was in the nature of a mixed blessing with regard to maintenance.
The most combatant auxiliaries were the mercantile raiders, which, admirably selected and well fitted for their task, caused the Allied navies considerable concern until they were finally rounded-up. Although German sea-going commerce was virtually brought to a standstill be the outbreak of the Second World War, Coastal shipping was kept busily employed. Coastal routes were heavily mined for protection, and, because of drifting, the shipping lines had to be constantly swept. Hence a large number of patrol, escort, minesweeping and minelaying vessels, were needed, and these were principally acquired from mercantile sources in Order to Supplement the Small number of naval vessels available for this purpose. This long and vulnerable coastline was exposed to constant attack by Allied naval vessels and aircraft, so that many auxiliary vessels saw more active Service than some of the regular warships.

    Quelle & ©: Macdonald & Co /Publischers) Ltd., London
letzte Änderung: 02.12.2018
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